Ariana Grande under fire from victim’s families for confessing that her dream dinner guest would be Jeffrey Dahmer

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

Published Jun 27, 2024 at 12:49 PM

Reading time: 2 minutes

59231

The family of one of Jeffrey Dahmer’s victims recently condemned singer Ariana Grande for showing an interest in meeting the infamous serial killer. During an appearance on the podcast Podcrushed, hosted by Gossip Girl alum Penn Badgley,  the pop star revealed that early in her career she told a group of young fans that Dahmer—who brutally murdered and dismembered 17 men over 13 years—was her ideal dinner guest.

This revelation deeply upset the loved ones of Tony Hughes, a deaf, non-verbal victim whom Dahmer killed in 1991. Hughes’ mother, Shirley, shared her distress with TMZ, explaining that Grande’s comments were hurtful and made her emotional. Shirley found it especially disturbing that the singer laughed during the podcast about her fascination with Dahmer.

The mother of the victim wants the singer and the general public to understand the very real pain that families of Dahmer’s victims endure whenever his name is brought up: “To me, it seems like she’s sick in her mind. It’s not fancy or funny to say you would have wanted to do dinner with him. It’s also not something you should say to young people.”

Hughes’ sister, Barbara, echoed similar sentiments, expressing her concern that Grande’s comments glamorise Dahmer. Barbara emphasised that such remarks are insensitive to the victims’ families, who continue to grapple with the horrors inflicted by the serial killer and shared that she believes the Wicked star should apologise to set the record straight for her fans, underscoring that it’s not right to idolise or trivialise a man who committed such heinous acts.

Grande has not been the only one to face backlash for her comments about Jeffrey Dahmer. In fact, Ryan Murphy, the creator of the Netflix series Dahmer–Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer Story, also encountered significant criticism.

One user stated on X: “The fact that “Dahmer” on Netflix was created by Ryan Murphy—a white gay man with a history of engaging in exploitative and fetishising representations of queer people of colour—should tell you everything you need to know.”

Another netizen added: “I get a bit of an ick when I think too much about how many of these horror shows Ryan Murphy has done, even his “fictional” ones are very rooted in real life and taken from very real serial killers. Especially hearing the family of Dahmer’s victims weren’t consulted.”

Murphy defended his project by stating that extensive research was conducted and efforts were made to contact the victims’ families and friends, though they received no responses.

Surely, a part of human nature finds the macabre and the minds of terrible criminals intriguing. This curiosity can stem from a desire to understand the darkest aspects of humanity or to feel a sense of safety by learning about such dangers from a distance. However, there’s a fine line between being intrigued and being insensitive.

Grande’s comments, while perhaps intended to be provocative or humorous, fail to acknowledge the profound suffering of Dahmer’s victims and their families.

Keep On Reading

By Sam Wareing

TikTok users horrified after Jeffrey Dahmer ‘polaroid challenge’ goes viral

By Sam Wareing

An 8-year-old boy has been dubbed the ‘world’s youngest serial killer’

By Sam Wareing

Caught in the act: 15 serial killers who were captured in the most ridiculous ways

By Charlie Sawyer

Jennifer Coolidge thanks evil gays during Emmy Awards 2024 acceptance speech

By Charlie Sawyer

Who is Claudia Sheinbaum, the scientist set to become Mexico’s first woman president?

By Charlie Sawyer

Brooklyn Beckham launches London pop-up restaurant to bless us with his cooking

By Abby Amoakuh

Grave site for Megan Thee Stallion’s mother ramps up security after Nicki Minaj fans leak location

By Charlie Sawyer

Conspiracy theorists fear for King Charles’ safety after white bloody horse spotted in central London

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

Strippers’ bill of rights: Understanding the new law protecting adult dancers in Washington State

By Abby Amoakuh

Is football apolitical? Here is how FIFA and the UEFA are used to further political agendas

By Charlie Sawyer

Why North West’s Lion King performance has made me team nepo baby

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

Can rejection therapy really heal your social anxiety? TikTok suggests so

By Abby Amoakuh

RuPaul’s new online bookstore Allstore removes anti-trans and far-right books following controversy

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

Inside Universallkidz, the school teaching conspiracy theories and sacred drumming to UK students

By Abby Amoakuh

From techno string quartets to thrifted dresses, Gen Z weddings are on the rise

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

What just happened? Breaking down the most viral moments from the Biden-Trump debate

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

Exploring The Gambia’s attempt to reverse its ban on FGM and how the ritual cutting impacts women worldwide

By J'Nae Phillips

How Gen Z women are using fashion to say f*ck you to the male gaze

By Abby Amoakuh

Kesha calls out P Diddy during surprise performance with Reneé Rapp at Coachella

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

Who is Bianca Censori and why is her controversial family worried about Kanye West?