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Three producers at ‘The Ellen Show’ have been fired by DeGeneres over toxic workplace claims

By Harriet Piercy

Aug 18, 2020

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Which ‘The Ellen Show’ producers were fired?

On Monday 17 August, Ellen DeGeneres, comedian on the talk show The Ellen Show, produced by Warner Bros informed staff over a video conference that she had fired three of the show’s top producers in response to accusations of bad behavior on set. Ed Glavin, the show’s executive producer, co-executive producer Kevin Leman and Jonathan Norman, the head writer were all fired.

Why were these producers fired?

After months of anonymous complaints from former as well as current employees, who reported experiencing mistreatment including racism and intimidation and stated that it was a “toxic workplace,” DeGeneres issued her second apology stating that “On Day 1 of our show, I told everyone in our first meeting that The Ellen DeGeneres Show would be a place of happiness—no one would ever raise their voice, and everyone would be treated with respect. Obviously, something changed, and I am disappointed to learn that this has not been the case. And for that, I am sorry.”

In a memo sent to the staff, DeGeneres added that she and the studio would immediately take steps to address the issues raised. “As we’ve grown exponentially, I’ve not been able to stay on top of everything and relied on others to do their jobs as they knew I’d want them done. Clearly some didn’t. That will now change and I’m committed to ensuring this does not happen again.”

In a BuzzFeed News investigation, former staff members accused Leman of sexually harassing a number of employees, to which Leman has denied “any kind of sexual impropriety.” Ed Galvin, who is yet to comment, has been accused by many former employees who claimed that Galvin “had a reputation for being handsy with women,” especially in the control room.

Tony Okungbowa, a former DJ on The Ellen Show, addressed his experience in an Instagram post, captioned “While I am grateful for the opportunity it afforded me, I did experience and feel the toxicity of the environment. And I stand with my former colleagues in their quest to create a healthier and more inclusive workplace as the show moves forward.”

DeGeneres confessed that she was also learning that people who work with her and for her are speaking on her behalf, which is misrepresenting who she is, and that she wanted it to stop. “As someone who was judged and nearly lost everything for just being who I am, I truly understand and have deep compassion for those being looked at differently, or treated unfairly, not equal, or—worse—disregarded. To think that any one of you felt that way is awful to me.”

Some crew members complained they were abandoned during the shutdown due to COVID-19, Warner Bros. is withholding comments as investigation is still being conducted, and the studio has said the whole crew has been paid during the pandemic but at a reduced rate. 

Three producers at ‘The Ellen Show’ have been fired by DeGeneres over toxic workplace claims


By Harriet Piercy

Aug 18, 2020

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Ethnic minorities need to come together against racism during the coronavirus pandemic

By Tahmina Begum

Mar 17, 2020

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On what seemed like a typical start to the weekend, I, like many others, was searching for what my usual Friday night takeaway would be. Inspired by Michelle Chai’s tweet asking others to make their weekly takeout an East Asian choice, as her family business, like so many other local restaurants, was suffering due to the racism that developed along the coronavirus outbreak, I was flicking through a vast amount of choices—ironically during the heights of stockpiling.

Did I want Chinese, Vietnamese or Thai? Were there any halal Korean places near me? I thought. I could do with a piping hot bibimbap. That’s when I looked up to see my mother’s concerned face. She asked if I was really going to get a Chinese takeaway in the midst of everything. I deeply sighed yes. That’s when I realised that coronaracism was affecting everyone, whether they noticed it or not. Here’s why now is the time for ethnic minority communities to come together.

In my mother’s defence, as an excellent cook who is against any takeout regardless of what’s happening in the world, she would have questioned me the same any day of the week. Yet her moment of ignorance as a South Asian immigrant woman represents an amalgamation of overconsumption of hysterical news, political divergent tactics onto minority East Asian communities as well as good old fashion immigrant fear. It pushes people into thinking that they have to take a step back or they will somehow also end up in the ‘firing line’.

Though her momentary slip—and it was a moment because who can say no to bibimbap?—was not malicious nor vindictive, it was a snapshot of ethnic minorities falling into the trap of distraction via racism. My mother, among many other people, is not blaming leaders who are in charge of our safety and security nor is she questioning why we’re still having to pay mortgages when countries like Italy paused all mortgage payments due to decline in work but instead is looking to turn away from each other in a time of need.

A key explanation I gave my mother about why it’s so integral we support East Asian businesses (not just Chinese businesses but also Vietnamese, Cambodian and Malaysian ones as racism has a history of being dumb and presumptuous) was the thousands of Indian restaurants that were affected by the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Indian restaurants, owned by Muslims or not, were left empty because customers didn’t want to support their businesses. Regulars consciously moved away from them in case they were mistaken for being terrorist sympathisers and therefore personally viewed as less American or British.

In China, Islamophobia is currently at an all-time high and the country has recently been called out for putting Uighur Muslims in concentration camps. But locals are not the issue here and neither should they be in the UK. It would be a shame to treat people how you have known to be treated.

In an era where marching and activism became ‘cool’, the East Asian community has previously received slack for not participating enough. Whether that’s local politics or speaking up for Black Lives Matter and other people of colour, there seems to be a lack of socio-political engagement. Chinese immigrants are usually perceived as the invisible community, they are seen to be “good immigrants” writes Wei Ming Kam in The Good Immigrant. They are “sensible, quiet, shy” so they “integrate well” but these model minorities are “not seen as humans, because we never get to be complex individuals. Our defining characteristic is generally our foreignness.”

Regardless of how well you may assimilate into western cultures, blame can always be misplaced. When President Trump calls coronavirus the ‘Chinese virus’ on Twitter, we’re watching a community being used as a scapegoat in real-time when we all know that viruses don’t discriminate and definitely don’t take your ethnicity into consideration. There are many more examples that can highlight this racism in times of crisis.

As ethnic minorities, we might feel that the ‘easy thing’ to do would be to align with white supremacy and point the finger at China in hopes that for a moment racism will forget about us and our own battles. However, what this pandemic has taught me so far is that it’s an opportunity to offer generosity. We need to form a bridge where there have been cultural and religious differences and not remain silent because we are the first ones to know exactly of the consequences when no one is on the other side—how terrible it can be when the rest of humanity decides to stay quiet.

In the meantime, my last advice for you is to order that Chinese takeaway while also educating your older parents on why they shouldn’t worry about their health when eating Chinese food and why they need to support their local businesses. We can be a part of the rise of communal aid. Show them that when we don’t give into fearmongering, we stop accusing each other and get to the real work of rebuilding society. We take away the power over us and foster relationships that will last beyond any virus outbreak.

Ethnic minorities need to come together against racism during the coronavirus pandemic


By Tahmina Begum

Mar 17, 2020

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