Tradwife influencer uses racial slur in cooking video, unapologetic amid backlash

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

Published Jun 14, 2024 at 02:09 PM

Reading time: 2 minutes

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In the name of traditional values, a self-proclaimed tradwife influencer has sparked a firestorm of controversy after using the N word and other offensive remarks during a cooking video on TikTok.

Lilly Gaddis, who promotes herself as an advocate for traditional roles, made a series of deeply offensive comments while filming a video in her kitchen. She derogatorily referred to “dumb whores,” “immigrants fresh off the boat looking for a green card,” and “gold diggers.”

“You are getting the opinion from some dumb whores and immigrants fresh off the boat looking for a green card. Yes, they are probably gold diggers but that is the exception—I am the rule,” she said in the clip, which has since been deleted from the platform, along with Gaddis’ account. “Everyone I know that is married right now is married to broke ass [N word], and they don’t care. We don’t give a fuck about money.” The video quickly went viral, garnering millions of views and leading to Gaddis’ account being suspended.

Despite the outrage and disgust her comments generated, Gaddis only intensified her stance. On 10 June 2024, she addressed the backlash in a video on X (formerly Twitter) to her 73,000 followers, admitting her post “seems to have upset members of a certain community.” She provocatively added: “All the backlash made me do a deep dive and a soul search and after all that I still couldn’t find a care.”

The depth of Gaddis’ racist and offensive remarks cannot be understated. By casually using racial slurs and perpetuating harmful stereotypes, she not only displayed a shocking level of ignorance and insensitivity but also highlighted how dangerous and damaging such rhetoric can be when spread on social media.

As a result of her inflammatory video, Gaddis was fired from her job at Rophe of the Carolinas, a home healthcare company for the elderly and disabled in Wilmington, North Carolina. The company released a statement on 11 June, not naming Gaddis directly but referencing a “newly hired” employee dismissed for “inflammatory remarks on social media that do not align with the values and beliefs” of the company, which is “operated by African American female and immigrant-owned businesses.”

Gaddis reacted to her firing on X by sarcastically writing: “Oh no I just got fired! #mob,” and began sharing posts from right-wing influencers. “If my freedom of speech is taken, they’ll be coming for yours next,” she declared Monday night after her initial response video.

In her subsequent posts, Gaddis continued to use racial slurs and provocatively stated, “Thanks Black community for helping to launch my new career in conservative media! You all played your role well like the puppets you are.”

What really worries me is that in recent years, the concept of a ‘trad wife’ has gained considerable traction, particularly on social media platforms like TikTok and Instagram. Traditionally referring to a woman who embraces domestic roles and upholds conservative values within marriage, the trend has seen a resurgence with influencers like Nara Smith and Ballerina Farm amassing millions of followers.

They portray an idealised image of traditional femininity, blending homemaking skills with a curated sense of nostalgia for simpler times.

However, this trend’s popularity raises concerns about its broader societal implications. As admiration for traditional values grows, so too does the risk of promoting nationalism, patriotism, and even racism. Lilly Gaddis’s recent controversy exemplifies this danger, where her inflammatory remarks on social media underscored how easily such sentiments can escalate, affecting not only individuals but also reflecting a deeper cultural shift.

As influencers shape perceptions of what it means to be a ‘trad wife,’ navigating these trends with awareness and responsibility becomes crucial, ensuring they do not inadvertently foster harmful ideologies.

Gaddis has already created a new TikTok account where she wrote as a caption in her first video: “You can’t take me down. P.S tiktok i am not bullying,” and used the hashtag #Trump2024. God help us.

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