Michael J. Fox speech at the BAFTA Awards 2024 leaves viewers in tears

By Charlie Sawyer

Updated Feb 21, 2024 at 12:51 PM

Reading time: 1 minute

The 77th British Academy Films Awards (BAFTAs) were held on Sunday 18 February 2024 in London. And while there were countless memorable speeches and red carpet interviews throughout the night, one particular special appearance had the entire audience in tears.

Towards the end of the evening, renowned Back to the Future actor Michael J. Fox took to the stage to present the Best Film award and I think it’s fair to say that there wasn’t a dry eye in sight.

Fox, who is currently living with Parkinson’s disease, came onto the stage in a wheelchair before insisting on standing at the podium to deliver a speech and present the award, a prize which ultimately went to Oppenheimer.

@bbc

Michael J. Fox gets a standing ovation for presenting the award for Best Film 👏 ❤️ #BAFTA #iPlayer

♬ original sound - BBC - BBC

Introduced by David Tennant as a “true legend of cinema,” Fox stated: “Five films were nominated in this category tonight and all five have something in common. They are the best of what we do.”

The actor, best known for his starring role in the Back to the Future franchise, noted how films can bring people together “no matter who you are or where you’re from.”

Fox also stated: “There’s a reason why they say movies are magic because movies can change your day. It can change your outlook. Sometimes it can change your life.”

Since his diagnosis in 1991, Fox has greatly decreased his public appearances, so netizens were immediately thrilled to see the actor once again take the stage:

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