I ‘got messy’ with Pottery Boy, everyone’s favourite clay-slapping Aussie TikToker

By Charlie Sawyer

Published Nov 27, 2022 at 09:15 AM

Reading time: 5 minutes

In this very experimental and increasingly aesthetically oriented era of gen Z-dominated social media, users have been gifted (and sometimes bombarded) with a plethora of new creators bringing expressive artistry to the app in some of the most appetising ways. Now, in an attempt to lift the all too see-through veil, we find ourselves wanting to learn more about the sometimes not-so-subtle art of sexy TikTok.

There’s Cedrik Lorenzen for example, the self-proclaimed sexy chef who exploded onto the platform and brought a whole new meaning to the online world of ‘food porn’. We also can’t forget Thoren Bradly—the hunky lumberjack whose forest antics could motivate even the laziest of netizens to take a laborious hike in the woods, solely in hopes of catching a glimpse of his axe.

While we might like to pretend that we use the video-sharing app to keep up on daily news, participate in worthwhile community conversations, or stay up to date with trending medical paranoia—and don’t get me wrong, this does happen—we would be lying to ourselves if we didn’t admit that every once in a while, we pray to the TikTok gods that the algorithm will work its magic and feed us something slightly more promiscuous and naughty.

Well, after dipping our toes into #WetTikTok during our recent talk with Lorenzen, we couldn’t just stop there, so we reached out to another creator who has begun to make waves on the social media site.

Enter Guy Vadas, or as he’s known online, Pottery Boy. The 24-year-old creator—picture an Australian version of Patrick Swayze’s character in Ghost—is bringing the art of shaping clay and other ceramic materials to the masses by convincing us all that we too can become masters of the wheel. SCREENSHOT spoke with the Aussie potter about his journey to TikTok fame and where his signature ‘clay slap’ originated from…

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Pottery Boy 🥣 (@pottery.boy)

Taking the wheel

Pottery comes to people at all different kinds of ages, for some, it’s an interest sparked from a primary school party, for others, it’s a skill you take up later in life after deciding that listening to podcasts is in fact not an actual hobby.

For Vadas, one class was all it took to get the Australian hunk hooked. “I started the pottery journey after a friend of mine asked me to go to a class with her. I went and I sat around this table with four to five 60 to 65-year-old ladies and we made these pieces by hand. Soon after, I rented a wheel at my house, started making videos here and there and people just really started gravitating towards it and that was kind of how it all kicked off.”

Pretty soon, Vadas had rented a studio and was teaching his own classes. Meanwhile, his online audience was growing, and Pottery Boy was born. Currently boasting over 1.2 million followers on TikTok, Vadas has cemented himself as the go-to potter on the platform.

@potteryboy

Just making a funky bowl, I really enjoyed this process. V satisfying 🍶 #pottery #potteryboy #onlypots

♬ original sound - Gurtêj

This ‘clay cowboy’ has conquered the algorithm—his most popular video amassing over 48 million views—by engaging with an enthusiastic audience that simply cannot get enough of his fun creations. I also assume that the shirtless factor of his content doesn’t hurt.

@potteryboy

Making a huge spiral vase. It’s been a minute since I’ve been on the wheel but it’s good to be backk pottin #potteryboy #onlypots #ceramicstudio #satisfying #ceramics #pottery

♬ Just the Two of Us - Grover Washington, Jr.

It's claytime!

Vadas maintained his following during the COVID-19 pandemic by bringing pottery straight to people’s doors. He explained: “The reason for the DIY claytime kits was sort of in response to everyone going into lockdown and people not being able to come into my studios where I was teaching, so we created the kits so that people could continue making and continue engaging with clay from home.”

@its.claytime

This is How to make a mug in 20 seconds 😱 #pottery #potterytiktok #potteryboy #claytime #diy

♬ Just The Two of Us - Kauai45 & Sweet Cocoa

When it comes to his chosen platform, Vadas never intended for his page to be focused solely on promoting the claytime kits. “I didn’t find TikTok the best platform to engage with customers, it’s never really been about the business side for me, it’s more about the fun side and reaching people—most of our advertising when we were selling kits was always through Instagram and Facebook,” he explained.

And according to the data shown on the app, it does seem like his slightly more personal content has performed the best for Pottery Boy, with some of his most popular videos featuring insider tidbits about his life or showing off his personality while he’s sat at the wheel.

Where does the ‘get messy’ brand come from?

If you’re a fan of Pottery Boy, or you’ve just taken a quick glance at his soothing page, you’ll recognise the iconic phrase “come get messy with me.” Seemingly both a tagline and mantra, this claytastic (sorry, I had to) expression has become synonymous with Vadas’ online brand. And according to the creator, his online identity is always slightly changing and shifting as he grows.

“I think the ‘get messy’ brand definitely evolved slightly, there are certain elements of the videos that people definitely react more to and so I continue to include those. I’m always trying to add little bits and bobs and see how people react and see if that’s increasing engagement.”

@potteryboy

Anyone need a new art teacher? #ootd #artteachersoftiktok #potterywheel #workwearfashion #onlypots #potteryvids #potteryboy #potterychallenge

♬ -

Speaking of audience engagement, I couldn’t possibly let Vadas return to enjoy the Aussie sunshine without asking him more about his most recent techniques to attract a wider audience outside of the potter community. Let’s address the elephant in the room—the shirtless pottery videos, we see what you’re doing.

You only have to scroll for mere seconds in the comments section of one of these steamy videos to find yourself drowning in remarks from users appreciating the clips. One netizen wrote, “Oh to be clay,” while another said: “My boyfriend wondering why I’ve played this [three times]… I just really like pottery, ok!”

When I ask Vadas about the clips in question he gently reminds me that he’s “not actually shirtless, I’m always wearing an apron.” I can’t imagine the apron is what all these newly pottery-obsessed fans are concentrating on, but fair enough…

@potteryboy

Because you liked the last one so much. Just making a cute vase for my Mumma. #pottery #potteryboy #onlypots #potteryclass #satisfying

♬ Just the Two of Us - Grover Washington, Jr.

I was also interested to find out if having viewers seek out his page solely for these clay-inspired thirst traps bothered the gen Zer. Unsurprisingly, he’s not fazed: “To be honest I don’t really care what they come for, as long as they come and enjoy the content. You know, some people are here for the pottery, some people are here for the ‘apron pottery’ and some are here for both so I don’t really think too much about it. I just try to enjoy making the content and try to make it as fun and enjoyable as possible for people to watch.”

Vadas may be the most chill TikToker of all time—probably due to his naturally laidback Aussie roots—as when I question him about any kind of online hate he’s received, he’s coy and casual. “I’ve not had anything major, on a platform like TikTok people are really honest and so some people don’t like the content, some people do—I try not to read into it too much. I just create content which I feel is fun,” he shared.

@potteryboy

500K ! You guys are nuts ❤️‍🔥 What should I make next? #potteryboy #onlypots #satisfying #potter

♬ original sound - Gurtêj

It seems that there may be more criticism coming from artists within the clay community. “In terms of fellow potters, especially the close-knit group of potters I know, I’ve never had any issues with them but there are some other potters who don’t know me so well who maybe have this idea about me but, again, I try to take no notice.” I suppose some people don’t recognise true art when they see it.

What’s up with Pottery Boy’s signature slap?

Now, onto the question we’ve all been wanting to ask. Where did the signature pottery slap come from? Is clay satisfying to smack? What magic are you sprinkling into that slap that’s making me rethink my entire existence? Well, wait no longer—Pottery Boy has the answer.

According to the creator, the slap originated “just in [my] brain—I just did it one day and thought ‘ah that felt good’ and it just went from there.” There you have it, some people just get it.

Oh, and if you were at all worried about the mainstream clay community pulling Pottery Boy away from TikTok, don’t fret, he’s only just getting started. “I really enjoy the content creation side of things and I definitely see myself building more of a personal brand around it.”

@

♬ -

Finally, my favourite question to ask creators on the platform: Who’s your favourite creator on the app? Pottery Boy’s answer: @gucci_pineapple, “He’s a guy from New York and he’s very quirky and unusual, it’s my kind of humour so he’d definitely be my favourite to watch.”

So, there we have it, let’s raise a toast to Pottery Boy—the clay creator who is singlehandedly getting gen Zers pumped about pottery.

Keep On Reading

By Alma Fabiani

Is David Attenborough dead? Netizens concerned by trending hashtag

By Alma Fabiani

Bad Bunny asks journalism students to help promote his new album

By Charlie Sawyer

What to do if your landlord increases your rent, from negotiating to appealing to a tribunal

By Charlie Sawyer

Who are Marvel actor Jonathan Majors’ girlfriend and ex-girlfriend, Meagan Good and Grace Jabbari?

By Abby Amoakuh

Who are the California Girls? Inside the women’s gang that stole $8 million in cosmetics and clothing

By Abby Amoakuh

Meta’s Kendall Jenner AI avatar roasts 818 Tequila and endorses other celebrity alcohol brands

By Abby Amoakuh

South Africa is challenging the Western-led world order with its genocide case against Israel

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

Nella Rose’s I’m A Celeb criticism proves that Black women can never win in reality TV

By Lois Freeman

From war zones to fashion runways: Model agencies exposed for recruiting women in refugee camps

By Charlie Sawyer

Understanding the sneaky link: Meaning of the dating trend beyond the hook-up

By Charlie Sawyer

Justice for Billie Piper: Why she’s worth so much more than her ex-husband Laurence Fox

By Abby Amoakuh

Carnivorous turtle able to chew through human bone found in Cumbria by local parish

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

Natalia Grace launches GoFundMe following explosive docuseries revealing her true age

By Charlie Sawyer

6 easy hacks to slay no spend January this year

By Abby Amoakuh

Netizens are comparing the Israel-Hamas war to the Hunger Games franchise. Here’s why it doesn’t work

By Abby Amoakuh

Kanye West to build a kingdom in the Middle East as part of his plans for a Yeezyverse

By Charlie Sawyer

Doritos faces boycott over new trans brand ambassador’s alleged tweet about 12-year-old

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

Are the Lemon Bottle fat dissolving injections taking over TikTok safe? Experts raise concerns

By Charlie Sawyer

Deepfake video of Bella Hadid stating her support for Israel goes viral

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

Tripping through J.Lo-land: Unpacking the singer’s most insane project yet