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What makes or breaks a TikTok sound? A look into the best bops and biggest flops

Since its inception, TikTok has provided us with tons of memes, viral dances and questionable beauty trends—has anyone actually tried vabbing? Moreover, the platform has also reassured us that clocking off at the end of the working day with a simple ‘Hehe bye’ is formal enough. Each of these TikTok creations live happily in our own personal For You Page (FYP), patiently waiting for their time to shine.

One of the most explosive forms of content that’s found its home on the video-sharing app has been original and, let’s say, eccentric songs, with most having been based off of already-viral audio clips. In order to help you gain a better understanding as to why this phenomenon is so popular, we’ve compiled a list of the very biggest bops and flops the TikTok sphere has brought us so far—and why some have landed a special place in netizens’ hearts, while others simply didn’t.

The bops

Let’s begin on a positive note, literally.

1. ‘It’s corn’

We couldn’t possibly start off this list without mentioning the song that is currently stuck in everyone’s mind. Uploaded to TikTok on 19 August 2022, the self-titled ‘It’s corn’ remix has quickly become the internet’s favourite food related bop of the year and is undoubtedly one of the most popular audio clips ever to circulate the video-sharing platform. 

This unique tune was created in homage to a viral interview that was shared on the platform on 4 August by popular TikTok account Recess Therapy. The account hosts a number of clips formatted in the ‘guy with a microphone’ interview style that has become increasingly popular on the app. The host, Julian Shapiro-Barnum, asks various children between the ages of two and nine for their advice, insight and, of course, food recommendations.

In the interview that inspired the song about corn, Shapiro-Barnum chats with a young boy about his new found obsession. The boy exclaims, “I really like corn, ever since I was told that corn was real, it tasted good!” He then goes on to have a mouth-watering revelation, declaring “when I tried it with butter, everything changed!”

This is where meme music enthusiasts schmoyoho enters the chat. The popular account is run by The Gregory Brothers, a quartet who specialise in producing comedic music. Having previously broken the internet with their rendition of ‘Chrissy, wake up!’, they turned their attention to something slightly different this time.

By simply adding a few backing vocals, guitar notes and a piano, schmoyoho produced an unforgettable banger. The video has already amassed over 4.6 million likes and is trending on every major social media platform. Stranger Things actress Grace Van Dien—who played the infamous Chrissy of season four—even deemed the sensation tweet-worthy, simply writing, “it’s CORN.”

@schmoyoho

intro song for any meal/snack with corn 🌽 - from iconic interview on @doingthings

♬ It's Corn - Tariq & The Gregory Brothers & Recess Therapy

2. ‘I wanna go home’

Next up is a classic fan-favourite, ‘I wanna go home’. First uploaded onto TikTok by a meme page in May 2022, the sound went viral almost immediately, clearly resonating with introverts across the globe.

@esosaadun1

😂🙄 #esosaadun

♬ original sound - ESOSA||CONTENT CREATOR

The sound bite originates from the track ‘It’s a Holiday’ by Nigerian gospel group, Destined Kids. Of course, we’re sure they could have never predicted the viral potential of this song—especially considering the rather emotional nature of the lyrics.

And yet, it’s become one of the most used sounds on the platform, with the original video having received over 2.5 million views at the time of writing.

The most viral videos that use the ‘I wanna go home’ audio tap into feelings we all can relate to. Scenarios such as: when your friendship group is expecting a big night out, and you’re just watching the clock, waiting to get back to your bed. Or even worse: that moment after you’ve eaten a big meal and you wish you were able to instantaneously teleport home and slide into some pyjama bottoms.

3. ‘Internet drama pt. 1 (Is this available?)’

‘Is this available?’ is potentially one of the most mesmorising bops we’ve been blessed with. In 2020, Canadian singer, musician, and video producer Lubalin shared an unusual-yet-brilliant musical rendition of a Facebook Marketplace interaction gone wrong, and TikTok absolutely loved it.

In what can only be described as hauntingly beautiful, Lubalin recites a text conversation between two individuals. The conversation begins as you would expect, with someone reaching out over text to enquire about a Marketplace offer. However, this soon escalates into an incredibly confusing, albeit hilarious, disagreement when one of the individuals decides they no longer want to be contacted.

The final message in the chat warns, “I’m no longer interested. Please stop contacting me now. I will contact the Attorney General if you do not stop.” We’re assuming their ‘Do Not Disturb’ button was broken.

@lubalin

that escalated quickly... #sodramatic #humor #oldpeoplefacebook #boomer #musician #producer

♬ original sound - Lubalin

This TikTok sound can only be described as if an online text disagreement was set to the soundtrack of ‘Bring Me to Life’ by Evanescence, it’s no surprise that the 90s rock band is currently experiencing an online renaissance and resurgence in popularity.

The flops

It’s nothing personal…

1. ‘He’s a 10’

Sadly, not everything produced for the platform can go viral—‘He’s a 10’ is one of these examples. Produced by singer Jaymmac, it was inspired by the June 2022 trend of the same name which consisted of people filming themselves either alone or with friends, contemplating how someone might appear a 10 but in reality they’ve most likely got a couple of noteworthy ‘icks’.

Some viral examples of this trend have been: “He’s a 10, but he listens to alpha male podcasts—ok he’s immediately a 2” or “He’s a 10, but he only posts me on his ‘close friends’.” You get the idea.

Jammac’s song doesn’t subtly hint at the trend—it literally participates in it. The opening lyrics read, “He’s a 10, but he only lasts a minute in bed. He’s a 9, but every time he always asks about my friend.”

@jaymmac

#fyp #hesa10but #hesa10 how many can we get!!!

♬ HesATen - Jaymmac

In 2021, American singer GAYLE received similar criticism for her song ‘abcdefu’. This cheesy style of music has often been attacked by gen Z netizens who seem far more interested in the Vine-esque, meme-like audios. There’s a reason ‘It’s Corn’ did so well…

2. ‘I like you, have a cupcake’

Last but not least, let us present you with the audio that drilled its way into our minds and then resolutely refused to leave. Based on the ‘I like you, have a cupcake’ excerpt taken from the animated show Fish Hooks that aired on Disney Channel during the 2010s the sound was predominantly used by TikTokers to publicly declare their love for certain celebrities. In the clip shown below, Chris Evans’ wide array of hair styles appear to be the object of a fan’s affection.

@chrisevanssonsgf

buzzcut, beard, long hair vs. mustache chris… #chrisevans #fyp #chrisevansbiteme #fishhooks

♬ i like you have a cupcake_fish hooks - ___

But you know what they say, ‘all that glitters is not gold’—after a while, the audio began to rattle some cages. Not long after it trended, a number of content creators included the clip in their ‘worst ever TikTok sounds’ listicles.

While ‘I like you, have a cupcake’ is far from unbearable, it fails to satisfy the ‘brain itch’ other adversaries have managed to tickle so well. Guess netizens will have to find a new trend to hop on in order to declare their love to Evans’ hairdo.

Amazon cashes in on TikTok trend with new TV show featuring viral Ring doorbell footage

If you spend at least a solid 30 minutes a day on TikTok, chances are you’ve seen the viral video of two drunk individuals—one woman, one man—standing in front of what the man believes to be the woman’s house. He is then seen asking his companion if she has the key to open her front door, to which she responds: “Why would I have the key?”

As it turns out, they’re standing on the porch of a complete randomer’s house—the person who ended up sharing the clip online, @sophie.sciascia—and are being filmed by her Ring video doorbell camera.

With over 2.5 billion views on the app and counting, it’s safe to say that #ringdoorbell content is gaining traction—and like always, Amazon, aka the company that owns and produces the smart home technology that captures viral-to-be clips, has come up with an effortless way to monetise on its device’s sudden rise in popularity.

As first revealed by entertainment news site Deadline, September 2022 will bring us—or audiences in the US, at least—Ring Nation, a TV show hosted by comedian Wanda Sykes which will feature short videos such as “neighbours saving neighbours, marriage proposals, military reunions and silly animals.”

@sophie.sciascia

by far the funniest thing my ring camera has ever captured. someone find these people so i can actually invite them over.

♬ original sound - Sophiesciascia

With Amazon completing its $8.5 billion acquisition of giant media company Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM)—known for its production and distribution of feature films and TV programmes—in March 2022, it’s no surprise as to why Ring Nation will soon be on our watchlists.

Let’s take a step back for a minute here. Amazon bought Ring in 2018 and MGM just this year—which, by the way, owns the production company behind the Emmy-winning documentary series Live PD, Big Fish Entertainment. In other words, it wasn’t enough for the multinational tech company to give law enforcement access to its loyal customers’ Ring camera footage without a warrant, it also had to go and produce a whole TV show to invite audiences to participate in the surveillance state.

@nelaaa888

I can’t stop laughing 😂😂 #ringdoorbell #caughtoncamera #amazon #foryoupage #fyp

♬ original sound - Y.medrano

Described as a “daily dose of life’s unpredictable, heartwarming and hilarious viral videos” in a press release, Ring Nation comes as yet another stark reminder that these days, privacy doesn’t represent much to most people—hello meta selfies and at-home DNA tests—especially when they’re offered 15 minutes of fame in exchange for it.