Tucker Carlson and Darren Beattie allege US government planted pipe bombs night before Capitol riots

By Charlie Sawyer

Published Jan 29, 2024 at 04:41 PM

Reading time: 2 minutes

If you thought that we were done with all of the rumours and conspiracy theories surrounding the 6 January Capitol riots, you’d be wrong. While it’s been over three years since the insurgence dominated headlines and had us all perpetually glued to our Twitter feeds, there appears to be a pretty wild update about a set of pipe bombs connected to a mysterious individual no one can seem to identify.

According to CBS News, the individual who investigators say left two pipe bombs outside the headquarters of the Democratic and Republican parties in Washington, DC the night before the 6 January attack is still on the loose. Moreover, the FBI is offering a $500,000 reward for information that may lead to the arrest of the person responsible.

Despite having access to CCTV footage and a widespread public campaign urging people to try and identify the assailant, authorities have had no luck in hunting down the suspect. All they do know is that the unknown individual wore Nike Air Max Speed turf shoes, a face mask, glasses, gloves and a grey hooded sweatshirt.

While the pipe bombs did not detonate, the FBI insisted that they had posed a “viable” danger to the public. In fact, Vice President Kamala Harris was evacuated from the Democratic National Convention (DNC) headquarters when the devices were recovered.

So, what’s the most recent update? Has the mystery individual been caught? No, instead, conspiracy theorists have decided to push the narrative that it was in fact government officials who planted the pipe bombs, all in a bid to stop Donald Trump from taking his “rightful” place as the President of the United States.

How did the pipe bomb rumours start?

It all began when Trump-ally and right-wing conservative Darren Beattie was removed from his position in the US Commission for the Preservation of America’s Heritage Abroad agency. According to Insider, his firing came after it was revealed that Beattie was continuing to occupy a position in the federal government given to him by Donald Trump, almost a year since Joe Biden took office and gained the ability to fire him.

Beattie’s appointment in 2020 caused outrage and since then multiple campaign groups have continued to call for his removal. In a statement to Insider, the Anti-Defamation League, which monitors anti-Semitism, said that Beattie should not be continuing to serve on the body. One of its spokesmen stated: “Since Beattie’s appointment to the Commission in November 2020, he has continued to spread outrageous and deeply harmful falsehoods and misinformation, including about the 6 January insurrection, that are at odds with serving in such positions of official responsibility.”

Clearly unfazed by his firing, Beattie posted this in response:

Since Trump left the White House, Beattie has only become more aggressive with his conspiracy theories and he debuted his most recent one, the one that pertains to the pipe bombs, on none other than Tucker Carlson’s show.

Carlson is of course an American conservative commentator who was infamously dismissed from Fox News in April 2023. Now, hosting his own show on X, Carlson spoke with Beattie about the pipebomb theory on 18 January 2024. During his appearance, Beattie stuck with the narrative that the bombs had to of been planted by insiders, a notion Carlson was clearly very taken with.

To say that Beattie’s evidence for this being an inside job is far-fetched, would be too kind. However, this conversation does prove how so many individuals, to this day, are still fixated on the conspiracy theories surrounding 6 January 2021.

The FBI has not released any other information on the case.

Keep On Reading

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

QAnon conspiracy theorists claim Iowa shooting was a political coverup for Jeffrey Epstein scandal

By Abby Amoakuh

Inside Mark Zuckerberg’s secret Hawaiian apocalypse bunker and the doomsday conspiracy behind it

By Abby Amoakuh

Far-right influencers try to bail out Elon Musk as Disney and Apple leave X due to antisemitism claims

By Alma Fabiani

17 viral AI-generated songs, from Sprinter by a toothbrush to Hips Don’t Lie by Cartman

By Alma Fabiani

Bad Bunny asks journalism students to help promote his new album

By Charlie Sawyer

Side hustles are going to be taxed in the UK in January 2024. Here’s everything you need to know

By Charlie Sawyer

Zac Efron reveals gruelling body transformation for upcoming wrestling film The Iron Claw

By Charlie Sawyer

Deepfake videos of Taylor Swift and Selena Gomez used in elaborate Le Creuset online scam

By Bianca Borissova

Bunny, cat, fox, boy, girl: What type of pretty are you? Unpacking TikTok’s latest beauty obsession

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

Florence Pugh reveals her mum got high with Snoop Dogg at the Oscars

By Alma Fabiani

TikToker predicts squatterscore as the next big thing. Please, let’s not

By Charlie Sawyer

Is the internet finally falling out of love with Emma Chamberlain?

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

Friends co-stars and family pay heartfelt tribute to late Matthew Perry

By Alma Fabiani

Biden’s impeachment inquiry explained and how abortion will impact the 2024 US elections

By Abby Amoakuh

Grand Theft Auto 6 leak reveals game’s first female protagonist and a glimpse into franchise’s future

By Charlie Sawyer

Jacob Elordi accused of grabbing radio employee’s throat over Saltburn bathwater prank

By Charlie Sawyer

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak sacks Home Secretary Suella Braverman as cabinet reshuffle begins

By Charlie Sawyer

How to get a refund on your train ticket this Christmas

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

Explicit 18+ flyers of Democrat Susanna Gibson sent to voters in a sexist Republican smear campaign

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

Female students fear harassment after all-male committee form pro-life society in Manchester