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Anti LGBTQ politician resigns after being caught at an all male orgy party

By Harriet Piercy

Dec 5, 2020

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An anti-LGBTQ politician from Hungary, and the husband of a high-profile female Hungarian constitutional court judge, Jozsef Szajer, resigned from the European Parliament on Sunday after he was caught fleeing from what was described as a 25 man orgy in Brussels, which was busted by police for breaching Belgium’s COVID-19 pandemic lockdown rules. What happened exactly?

Szajer allegedly climbed out a first floor window and was spotted “fleeing along the gutter” from a party, according to Sarah Durant, a spokeswoman for the Brussels region’s deputy public prosecutor. “The man’s hands were bloody,” Durant continued that “It is possible that he may have been injured while fleeing. Narcotics were found in his backpack. The man was unable to produce any identity documents. He was escorted to his place of residence, where he identified himself by means of a diplomatic passport.” It was reported he tried to claim diplomatic immunity.

The orgy’s organiser has denied doing anything wrong when the secret party was raided by the police, inevitably catching the men in the act. Within those that were caught, was Szajer, who is a close political ally of right-wing Hungarian president Viktor Orban. Szajer has since resigned from his role in the European Parliament. According to Reuters, President Orban told the Magyar Nemzet newspaper that Szajer’s actions were “indefensible” and that they went against the values of Fidesz’s political group which effectively portrays itself as a champion of traditional Christian values, which do not include homosexual acceptance.

Orban publicly stated: “We will not forget nor repudiate his 30 years of work, but his deed is unacceptable and indefensible. Following this, he took the only appropriate decision when he apologised and resigned from his position as member of the European Parliament and left Fidesz.”

The 20 people who attended the party were detained by the police in Brussels and reported that Szajer had narcotics on him, to which the politician denied taking and offered to take a drug test as proof on the scene. However, this was not carried out by the police. The Belgian newspaper La Derniere Heure quoted a local police source in saying that “We interrupted a gang bang.”

David Manzheley, who hosted the party, insisted to Reuters at his apartment in central Brussels that “We don’t sit around drinking tea. People are here for sex.” Manzheley said that whoever attended was very careful and followed his one rule, being that everyone in attendance had to have previously contracted the virus. According to the Independent, he reportedly said “To be honest, I don’t see the problem. There were two nurses there, and they didn’t think it was dangerous either,” adding that it was like any other party, “We talk, we have a drink—just like at the cafe. The only difference is that in the meantime, we’re having sex with each other. I don’t see what’s wrong with that. We’re all adults, everything is by mutual consent.”

Szajer publicly followed up with an apology saying “The police continued the process and finally issued an official verbal warning and transported me home. I deeply regret violating the COVID restrictions, it was irresponsible on my part. I am ready to stand for the fine that occurs.”

In Hungary, fair right allies of Orban tried to explain the sex party scandal by claiming that Szajer was infact set up by the German secret service, however the media in Hungary only indicate that he was caught at a house party and simply was forced to resign due to him breaking the lockdown rules.

The LGBTQ community and critics of the party say that Szajer’s actions reeked of hypocrisy due to the nature and beliefs of the Fidesz leaders. The affair shows the “complete moral bankruptcy of Fidesz,” András Fekete-Győr, leader of opposition party Momentum, wrote in a Facebook post.

Orban’s Hungarian government has curtailed LGBTQ rights since he was elected as the prime minister in 2010, and Szajer helped to rewrite Hungary’s constitution. As reported by The Times, his intention was to “protect the institution of marriage as the union of a man and a woman.” Hungary also passed a law making it impossible for transgender or intersex people to legally change their gender, which left the government to propose legislation to ban adoptions by gay couples. The text of a proposed constitutional amendment notes that “the mother is a woman, the father is a man.”

According to the Guardian, a source in the European parliament said that “There is nothing wrong to participate in a sex party of any kind. However, such kinds of meetings with many people are illegal under the coronavirus laws. The fact of being covered by parliamentary immunity does not exempt anyone from obeying the law.”

The event is still unresolved completely, but as Szajer announced his resignation as an MEP, he also asked the public to treat the matter as “strictly personal” to him. Controversial to this however, are the very personal and life impacting decisions that Fidesz made towards the LGBTQ community, which introduces proof of how potentially corrupt power, especially political power, can be.

Anti LGBTQ politician resigns after being caught at an all male orgy party


By Harriet Piercy

Dec 5, 2020

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During the COVID-19 crisis, LGBTQ rights are under threat

By Yair Oded

May 22, 2020

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For the LGBTQ community, the coronavirus crisis has worsened an already precarious reality—physically, emotionally, socially, politically and economically. Sadly, the unique needs and hardships faced by the queer community, and particularly the most marginalised within it, are, for the most part, excluded from the global discourse surrounding the pandemic and our societies’ reaction to it.

Research indicates that queer people are drastically more susceptible to substance abuse and mental health problems, including depression and anxiety, and are more prone to suicidality. This results, to a large extent, from what researchers define as ‘minority stress’; queer members of other minority groups (such as people of colour and immigrants) often experience increased levels of minority stress. Physical distancing and an abrupt reduction in social interactions during COVID-19 are noted by experts to exacerbate the mental and emotional strain experienced by LGBTQ people, and particularly queer youths and young adults.

Lack of access to care during the pandemic also significantly impacts the queer community, as many services vital to their well-being have been regarded as ‘nonessential’. An article published by Harvard Medical School titled COVID-19 and the LGBTQ+ community: Rising to unique challenges notes that trans and non-binary people may be having difficulty accessing hormone treatments and surgeries during the crisis—both of which are essential for their physical and mental well-being.

Furthermore, the economic fallout from the pandemic is proving to be a great source of distress for the queer community. Seeing as many LGBTQ people were economically disadvantaged prior to the outbreak of coronavirus, the current crisis puts them at an increased risk of unemployment, homelessness, and food insecurity.

“When something like the pandemic happens, the lowest on the totem pole are always the ones that are forgotten,” Jari Jones, a New York City-based trans actress and activist, told Screen Shot. “A lot of rich white queers who are living in New York were able to leave the city, and were able to go to their rich homes or parents and quarantine there, while a lot of queer people of colour, mainly, or those experiencing homelessness or travelling from home to home now had to find a way to be stationary within New York—there wasn’t the option of leaving, ” she added. “[This] affects people of colour in a dramatic way because a lot of us don’t have the resources to be in safe areas […] a lot of us had to go into the shelter system, which only exposes you more to the virus.”

The pandemic has also served as an excuse for oppressive leaders around the world to curtail the rights and liberties of queer people. In Hungary, Viktor Orbán’s parliament—now ruling by decree due to the COVID-19 emergency—just passed a bill which, among other provisions, amends the civil registry document to read ‘sex assigned at birth’ instead of ‘sex’. This move by the Hungarian government precludes trans and non-binary people from ever having their gender identity be recognised by the state, and opens the door to further violence and discrimination against them.

Hungary is merely one out of many European countries in which the pandemic accelerates the erosion of queer rights—a recent report by ILGA Europe finds. Members of ILGA-Europe also crucially point out that it’s not overwhelming public support but rather widespread indifference which makes this anti-queer campaign possible.

But not all is bleak. While the current crisis has presented new (and intensified existing) challenges for LGBTQ people, the pandemic has also encouraged increased activism and mutual-aid among queer communities. “We come from generations of people who had to band together, who had to make do with what we got,” said Jones, referencing the rallying-up of queer communities, and particularly queer people of colour, in response to the virus. “I’m seeing a lot of people and grassroots organisations coming together to feed each other, to deliver masks, deliver medicine, to make sure our elders of colour are taken care of. These organisations are giving out money and funds and food to make sure that those people are staying afloat.”

“It’s refreshing to see parts of the community, or sub-communities, come together to make sure that we’re still thriving through this,” Jones added.

The implications of the coronavirus crisis will be evident for years to come, and the chaos left in its wake will be felt most potently by vulnerable groups, including the queer community. A genuine resilience to this virus can only be developed if the specific needs and challenges of all segments of the population are acknowledged and addressed. And so, the prevailing apathy must be urgently replaced with keen readiness to act, not just on behalf of, but alongside society’s most marginalised.

During the COVID-19 crisis, LGBTQ rights are under threat


By Yair Oded

May 22, 2020

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