AI might save lives on a climate changed Earth

By Yair Oded

Published Sep 21, 2018 at 03:13 PM

Reading time: 2 minutes

2018 has seen a disturbing surge in the effects of climate change, which wreak havoc across every continent. Whether it’s due to unbearable droughts or perilous floods, entire communities around the world undergo the painful process of bouncing back from natural disasters and readjusting their lives to the rapidly changing climate and topographical conditions of the Earth. Although human activity and global industrialisation are to blame for the destruction of our planet’s ecosystem, it seems that, at least to an extent, a solution to the problem could emerge from technological advancements. Numerous initiatives are currently underway to utilise Artificial Intelligence (AI) and big data in order to both prepare for the changing landscape of coastal areas and increase the efficiency of human activity in order to minimise its adverse impact on the environment.

One Concern is a start up managed by Craig Fugate, the former head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The company employs AI and machine learning technologies to provide local authorities, community leaders, and decision makers with highly precise data regarding upcoming natural disasters, which will allow them to adequately prepare for their impact. One Concern supplements their high tech services with an in-person training to help their clients assess, respond to, and recover from natural disasters. In an interview for Scientific American, Fugate states, “If we can make the risks more definitive, we can at least start to get more control over our destiny—versus it being inflicted upon us each time a storm hits.” Fugate further argues that as part of its mission, One Concern advocates for an equal and fair transformation of coastal areas which over the next decades will have to plan for massive relocation of its population. Fugate warns against a scenario in which the burden of moving will be placed solely on lower income communities, and that big data and AI will be exploited by biased entities and developers seeking to maximise profits. The start-up considers all these factors when providing assistance and consultation to its clients.

Disaster prevention is only one aspect of the High Tech vs. Climate Change trend. AI For Earth is an initiative developed by Microsoft seeking to employ AI in an eco-friendly manner. The programme is aimed at providing individuals and organisations with technology that allows them to utilise climate data in order to increase the efficiency of their water and energy usage. Specifically, the programme uses AI in order to translate and process raw data of environmental systems so that farmers and agricultural companies could divide it into categories that make sense to them. In collaboration with the National Geographic Society, AI For Earth will be giving grants to a selected group of AI app designers and projects they believe could help perfect their product and furnish members of the agricultural sector, scientists, and sustainable initiatives with valuable and usable data regarding climate patterns.

Despite these tech advancements, here still lies an inherent risk in profiting off of such critical data compiled by AI and machine learning, as overtime such initiatives could be primarily concerned with monetary gains as opposed to tackling climate change and providing equal assistance to all those who are vulnerable to its effects. And so, as such technology is developed, it is crucial that both national and international organisations and bodies oversee its usage and ensure that its application benefits more than a select-wealthy-few.

Keep On Reading

By Abby Amoakuh

Sydney Sweeney claps back at TikTok scammer who pretended to be her dietitian

By Fleurine Tideman

I love you Barbie, but we need Feral Women Media now more than ever

By Abby Amoakuh

Controversial video chat site Omegle shuts down after mounting child abuse allegations

By Charlie Sawyer

How much money does tradwife influencer Nara Smith make from TikTok? Someone did the maths

By Abby Amoakuh

Nara Smith addresses Mormon religion as parodies of her lifestyle take over TikTok

By Fleurine Tideman

PETA joins team Ariana against Tom Sandoval ahead of Vanderpump Rules season 11

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

The Last of Us star Bella Ramsey reveals they want their next role to be the Joker

By Abby Amoakuh

Sydney Sweeney’s boobs have feminists divided: Where does liberation start and objectification end?

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

Videos of Israeli content creators seemingly mocking Palestinians spark online controversy

By Charlie Sawyer

Donald Trump warns of chaos and bedlam if his name is kept off the US presidential election ballot

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

Is Kylie Jenner broke? New conspiracy theory suggests the billionaire might be out of cash

By Abby Amoakuh

Two of Jeffrey Epstein’s victims are stalling the release of remaining documents as they fear physical harm

By Abby Amoakuh

TikTok comedian Matt Rife’s issue with his female fanbase is misogyny at its finest

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

Former Cloudflare employee Brittany Pietsch goes viral after filming brutal firing process

By Charlie Sawyer

Watch Tyler, the Creator and Post Malone get down to Colbie Caillat

By Abby Amoakuh

Mainstream media’s criticism of 9 to 5 girl is proof that boomers will always be out to get gen Z

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

Tom Holland has ultimate rizz, Zendaya just confirmed it

By Charlie Sawyer

Azealia Banks is cancelled once again after calling Troye Sivan an expired Twink

By Abby Amoakuh

White US politician tells primarily Black audience that her father born in 1933 was a white slave

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

Police rescue over 800 good-looking people lured into human trafficking love scam centre