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Get off and get stuffed: your vibrator can now track your food delivery

By Malavika Pradeep

Apr 2, 2021

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Has your lockdown period been synonymous with sex toys and takeouts? If so, we take great pleasure in introducing Grubuzz—a new technology that milks the power of teledildonics to send clitoris vibrations to users as their food ordered from a national chain or local favourite is being prepared and ultimately delivered.

Pioneered by the good folks over at CamSoda, the vibrator is built to track and give real-time updates on the status of your delivery via—you guessed it—frequency of vibrations. As the restaurant prepares your food, the toy would emanate slow, well-spaced pulsing which intensifies as your order gets picked up and delivered to your doorstep.

“People have been stuck at home for over a year now,” said Daryn Parker, Vice President of CamSoda in a press release. “They have grown accustomed to ordering takeout food from their favourite restaurants regularly.” In addition to the boom of quarantine cravings and food deliveries, Parker outlines a spike in demand for teledildonics. So they invested in the inevitable.

“Here at CamSoda we figured we’d combine these popular activities and produce a technology that gets people off while their food delivery order is being prepared and ultimately delivered,” Parker explained, summing up Grubuzz’s purpose as an innovation which will “not only leave your mouth watering but your private parts too.” “What better way to eat some of your favourite food from Olive Garden, Red Lobster, Outback Steakhouse, or P.F. Chang’s than after you’ve orgasmed?”

If you live in the UK and can’t relate with his list of mouthwatering restaurants, imagine literally getting off after a long day of ‘WFH’ while waiting for your Nando’s, KFC, Greggs, or Domino’s. Sounds pretty dreamy, right?

How does it work exactly?

Upon purchase, users will obtain a curated email address from CamSoda which they will then plug into their favourite delivery apps including GrubHub, Uber Eats, Caviar, DoorDash and Postmates. When an email is sent from these delivery apps updating the users on the status of their order, it will be forwarded to the CamSoda-generated email.

This will simultaneously set off a vibration to their internet-connected teledildonic device. The frequency of these vibrations will later increase throughout the food delivery process up until it reaches the user’s doorstep.

The innovation behind Grubuzz follows previous launches by the adult entertainment company within the food delivery industry. In 2018, CamSoda launched RubGrub, a vibrator that ordered food for users after they’ve had an orgasm—starting with a large cheese pizza from Domino’s.

RubGrub was made possible with an internet-programmed Bluetooth button (similar to the Amazon Dash Button) designed to fit onto a Lovense Nora vibrator. The button had payment, delivery and order information programmed into it at the time of purchase and connected to Domino’s through its pizza-ordering Application Programming Interface (API). When a user was done ‘using’ the vibrator, they pushed the button, which placed a delivery order for a large cheese pizza.

How safe is Grubuzz?

Given the nightmarish history of teledildonics, Grubuzzs’ safety is under fire. Earlier this year, we had men accidentally caging themselves in chastity belts—a move which left them scarred following months of recovery. Then came hacked livestream footages from a dildo, Bluetooth-enabled butt plugs and more.

While Grubuzz is a highly appealing innovation given its present context, it is in fact exploitable to hackers. The way hacking of these internet-connected sex toys usually pans out is via weak end-to-end APIs. The fault essentially welcomes encryption, giving absolutely anyone on the internet access to your sex toy. Sensitive information provided in-app or during purchase also becomes vulnerable as hackers engage in practices like ‘sextortion’ to leverage the data collected. The only way out is to avoid storing personal information on these apps along with regular cross-checking of API faults discovered by third-party testing firms.

However, if you truly want to experience ‘getting off in anticipation of getting stuffed later’, then CamSoda has good news for you: a male version will debut in the coming months. Welcoming everyone onto the boat, the adult entertainment company might just be pioneering another fictional scenario—replying ‘me too’ to the pizza delivery dude when he texts ‘I’m almost there’.

Get off and get stuffed: your vibrator can now track your food delivery


By Malavika Pradeep

Apr 2, 2021

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As sex toys continue to get hacked, the definition of sexual assault is under question

By Alma Fabiani

Sep 4, 2019

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The rise of the teledildonics industry, also known as connected sexual pleasure products, creates new fun ways for us to pleasure ourselves and our partners, with inventions such as vibrating Wi-Fi-enabled butt plugs and webcam-connected dildos. But teledildonics, just like everything else in our modern age it seems, are another privacy nightmare ridden with security flaws. Since 2018, there have been a number of reported hacked sex toys, and the most recent case makes me wonder: should we go back to good old non-connected sex toys just to avoid them getting hacked mid-sesh?

Privacy counts across all aspects of life, especially as we live surrounded by and depending on technology. That’s why, when it comes to smart sex toys, our privacy should count even more. According to Mozilla, an internet-connected device (sex toys included) has five minimum security standards: it must use encrypted communications, have automatic security updates, require a strong password, have a system in place for vulnerability management, and, finally, have a privacy policy that is easily accessible. I don’t know about you, but I’ve personally never checked for these five conditions in a sex toy before.

Evidently, I’m not the only one. Most recently, a woman had her butt plug hacked and controlled while she was presenting on stage. It later turned out to be a stunt designed to demonstrate to the audience just how susceptible these devices are to getting hacked. This incident sparked a frenzy as people feared it would happen to them. Not only would having your vibrator hacked be very strange, but it would also be done without your consent—just like the data-collection techniques that are used by Facebook, Alexa, and most technologies.

Marloes-Haarmans

In 2017, a man called Alex Lomas walked around Berlin and had to use only his phone in order to pull up a list of Bluetooth discoverable Lovense Hush butt plugs, ready to be hacked, just to manifest how easy it was. Last year, SEC Consultants looked at sex toys from Vibratissimo and demonstrated how they could be broken into by hackers not only to “remotely pleasure” people, but also to access owners’ account details. Even more worrying, a Wi-Fi-connected dildo’s internal camera was found to be easily accessible.

What can be said about hacking sex toys and consent laws? Because these are quite uncharted territories, we don’t know just yet what to do when someone hacks a sex toy or its data. In some countries, such as the U.S., laws that define what constitutes sexual harassment or assault vary from state to state. In many countries, the law is still vague about the definition of assault and sexual harassment. In the U.K., sexual harassment is defined as: “unwanted behaviour of a sexual nature which violates your dignity, makes you feel intimidated, degraded or humiliated, and creates a hostile or offensive environment.” The lack of precision surrounding sexual harassment and assault laws prevents us from taking concrete action in the event of a sex-toy hack. Worse yet, we don’t even know whether our data can be hacked into and stolen in the first place.

While the aim of this article isn’t to inspire anxiety and ignite a global wanking paranoia, it should force you to sit back and ask yourself, “What are the privacy implications of using a Bluetooth-connected sex toy?” Last time we ignored such concerns we ended up with the Cambridge Analytica scandal, Trump as the President of the U.S., and a moronic Brexit. Even though hacking sex toys isn’t yet defined as assault or sexual harassment, it may very well be regarded so once lawmakers start tackling the issue. In the meantime, maybe it’s worth dusting off the old non-connected sex toy hidden under your bed and relieve the stress with some alone time, if you know what I mean.

As sex toys continue to get hacked, the definition of sexual assault is under question


By Alma Fabiani

Sep 4, 2019

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