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Google is going after Amazon with new online shopping expansion

By Alma Fabiani

May 23, 2021

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During its conference for software developers, Google I/O, which kicked off on Tuesday 18 May, Google announced that it is deepening its partnership with Shopify by letting the company’s 1.7 million merchants make their products more discoverable in Google Search (and elsewhere). The move is an attempt to compete against a small internet firm called Amazon. Ever heard of it?

Although the company didn’t offer many details about the integration just yet, it said it will allow Shopify businesses to appear across Google Search, Maps, Lens, Images and YouTube “with just a few clicks.” As Amazon continues to increasingly compete with Google on search ads for commercial queries, which typically means a consumer is actively considering a purchase, it is expected to earn 19 per cent of all search ad revenue in 2021, compared with about 57 per cent for Google, according to eMarketer. In other words, Amazon is threatening Google’s core ads business, so Google is fighting back.

“Shares of Shopify popped as much as 4% on the news, closing up more than 3% on the day,” reported CNBC on Tuesday. But what does Google’s move mean exactly? In a blog post, the tech giant explained that this expansion will make Shopify merchants’ products more discoverable across its various properties. “We believe you deserve the most choice available and we’ll continue to innovate on shopping every step of the way,” said Bill Ready, president of commerce and payments at Google, during a presentation at I/O.

But Google is not stopping there—of course not, it’s going after Amazon remember? Separately, the company announced other enhancements to its e-commerce functionality. For example, Google’s Chrome browser will persistently display shopping carts when people open new tabs, so they can return to shopping after doing other tasks. Sounds pretty basic, but think of how many times you’ve left a cart halfway through and decided to get back to it only to find it empty? Correct me if I’m wrong, but nine times out of ten, I won’t bother doing it all over again.

As the COVID-19 pandemic hit, online retailers—mostly Amazon though—reaped huge profits after most of us turned to retail therapy in order to cope with the lockdown blues. Around the same time, Google said it was waiving commission fees for merchants that participated in its “Buy” programme, which allows consumers to search for and check out retailers’ products directly on its platform without being directed to retailers’ sites.

The company also said it would be opening its platform to third-party providers, including PayPal and Shopify, to allow retailers more buying options outside of its own platform. “As we eliminate barriers like fees and improve our technology, we’ve seen a 70% increase in the size of our product catalog and an 80% increase in merchants on our platform,” read its blog post.

Google’s so-called ‘Shopping Graph’ will now begin to pull together information from across websites, price reviews, videos and product data pulled directly from brands and retailers to help better inform online shoppers about where to find items, how well they were received, which merchant has the best price, and more.

But before any of this can really work, the company needs consumers to find shopping for products via Google actually useful. That’s where Shopify comes in. Although this integration doesn’t mean that every Shopify storefront will be included on Google (the merchants have to take an action to make that happen), it would be foolish for them not to leverage the new option. Shopify isn’t playing favourites when it comes to distribution, however. It’s integrated with other large platforms, too, including Facebook and TikTok, and it’s been working with Walmart to expand the retailer’s online marketplace as well.

So, what do you say? Shall we boycott Bezos’ baby and settle for the lesser of two evils instead?

Google is going after Amazon with new online shopping expansion


By Alma Fabiani

May 23, 2021

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Opinion

Confessions of a zero-waste Amazon Prime subscriber

By Danielle Knight

Nov 14, 2018

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Climate change

Nov 14, 2018

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London is expensive and informative. I’m woefully woke and sickeningly skint. Nowhere, perhaps with the exception of LA or Shanghai, would it be harder to hide from the deafening impact of my own thunderous carbon footprint while being relentlessly pressured to buy more stuff.

The free magazines outside tube stations scream zero waste guilt. You must buy tinted lip moisturiser in recyclable aluminium tubes, not those devilish plastic pots. Buy one in each colour! The next column is a real-life horror story: the toxic plastic microfibers from your clothes are polluting rivers and oceans via your washing machine and suffocating aquatic organisms. Only purchase clothes made with natural fibres from now on!

Instagram Search is similarly determined to whisk me down the zero-waste rabbit hole. Earnest models match grave expressions with bikinis and boardshorts, grasping bulging bags of single-use plastics they have collected along tropical beaches. Videos of the whirling Pacific Garbage patch induce a dizzying sense of vertigo at the sheer expanse of eternal trash human beings have made.

Beyond the thin, slippery pages and endless scrolling digital grid, I can’t escape carbon and plastic pollution around the city. Every fresh lungful of polluted air is heavy, gritty. The pavements are littered with plastic packaging. I feel gluttonous and ashamed of my complicity in all this and re-forge a broken promise with myself to attempt a zero waste lifestyle. Homemade lunches, refillable wine bottles, home-grown herbs, maybe composting? A spell of daydreaming later and I am convinced my tiny apartment and 4×3 foot balcony can accommodate a level of self-sufficiency akin to 1970s BBC sitcom “the Good Life”.

Until this wholesome new urban life of self-sufficiency materialises, I need an army of durable, non-plastic containers, string bags and reusable wrappers. At least, the hordes of zero waste bloggers I’ve been following tell me these are essential: an investment. Buying more stuff feels counter-intuitive, but I venture West, to zones abundant with zero waste homeware stores. Inside one, I lift a price tag on a set of glass lunchboxes and shudder involuntarily. I scrutinise their fragility as I recall the ocean of reusable coffee cups I’ve bought and somehow lost over the past year, before fleeing empty handed.

Food-wise, a complex groceries map is the only way to survive the weekend staples shopping marathon. Cycling my janky old bike down Hackney Road is a high speed, Olympic-level sport. The pavement and tarmac have become an obstacle course and I dodge the debris of discarded plastic bottles while balancing a heavy backpack stuffed with bulk buy spaghetti. The weekly cross-city grocery shopping route is now a five-hour roundtrip; a slow, gruelling marathon.

Each evening after work, the labour intensive craft of combining suspicious looking fridge scraps with bulk buy, zero waste ingredients sucks away the hours. Eating out is impossible. Life and leisure evaporate in a zero-waste haze.

Downtrodden, I remember one budget-conscious blogger recommended Amazon as a treasure-trove of sustainable toiletries and other essentials. Unable to shake the image of a tiny seahorse navigating the high seas, its tail wrapped around a plastic cotton bud, I sneak Amazon open on my browser. 100 biodegradable bamboo cotton buds for only £2.95. Undeterred by the universal Doctors’ advice not to poke cotton buds deep inside your ear canal, nor by my mum’s recent cotton bud related earache saga, I click ‘Buy Now’. The next day, the package plops through my letterbox. Since seeing that National Geographic seahorse, I have spent 10 long months deprived of the unbridled relief found from wiggling a sterile foreign object inside my ear.

Amazon first entangled me in a Prime subscription by offering one month free. After months of nudging emails and adverts for Prime membership, I finally succumbed to the allure of binge watching the TV adaptation of Philip K.Dick’s “the Man in the High Castle.” Free TV! Foolishly, predictably, I forgot to cancel the subscription before the end of the month months and they hit me with a full annual subscription fee. £79. As a disorganised graduate student with towers of textbooks to buy, the staggeringly low prices and convenience of next day delivery helped me post-rationalise that Amazon Prime was a bargain.

In this latest dalliance with Amazon, the algorithm was tightening its grip while I was weak with the exhaustion of zero waste living. The intimacies of my search history means Amazon guesses what I am up to and what my idealistic hopes and dreams are. Then, the product recommendations begin. The gadgets, the bulk buys, the “customers who buy this bought this”. Buy buy buy. So cheap!

I start reading posts from Polly, a zero waste budget blogger who helps assuage my guilt for supporting such a notoriously unethical company with soothing advice that boycotting Amazon is a privilege. She recommends some tactics for overcoming their wasteful packaging including emailing Amazon customer services to add a note on your account to avoid plastic packaging and using Amazon’s Frustration-Free Packaging service, which avoids the box around a box fiasco. Then, there is Amazon warehouse which sells second hand items. Decidedly happier, I scroll for more tips, until she hits me with the bombshell advice to avoid next day delivery, as it is terrible for the environment. Clumping purchases into one order helps minimise the carbon emissions associated with your order. Damnit. It dawns on me that everything about Amazon Prime is enabling and encouraging me to go hog wild buying zero waste products when really I should be buying as little as possible.

Although products are affordable, I am buying things I don’t really need and spending more than I budgeted for. Perhaps one reason local suppliers aren’t stocking these products at affordable price points is because Amazon undercuts everything. It’s a false economy. Local shops just can’t compete with London commercial rents to pay. The Amazon algorithm has data about my innermost concerns and manipulates me with clever marketing tactics. Perhaps, rather than sitting behind a computer screen or trekking to West London to shop zero waste, I should chat with local shop owners and encourage them to stock zero waste products. Then support them by buying from them. Huh.

Confessions of a zero-waste Amazon Prime subscriber


By Danielle Knight

Nov 14, 2018

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