Amazon’s solution to its delivery driver shortage? Recruiting stoners

By Alma Fabiani

Published Sep 2, 2021 at 10:56 AM

Reading time: 2 minutes

Amazon’s currently struggling with a severe shortage of delivery drivers in the US. But when it comes to next-day delivery, we all know Jeff Bezos isn’t kidding around, which is why the e-commerce giant has already found a solution, one that is surprising to say the least: it’s now recruiting marijuana users.

According to communications obtained by Bloomberg, Amazon has told its delivery partners to prominently state they don’t screen applicants for weed use. Doing so can boost the number of job applicants by as much as 400 per cent, Amazon told the publication in one message, without explaining how exactly it came up with the statistic.

Conversely, the company says, screening for marijuana cuts the prospective worker pool by up to 30 per cent. One delivery partner, who’s now stopped screening applicants after Amazon’s request, said that marijuana was the prevailing reason most people failed drug tests. Now that she’s only testing for drugs like opiates and amphetamines, more drivers pass.

While some of Amazon’s independent delivery partners are fine with simplifying their screening process, others aren’t too thrilled about its newly found stoner-friendly attitude. Understandably, there are concerns when it comes to the insurance and liability implications in the many states where marijuana use remains illegal. “They also worry that ending drug testing might prompt some drivers to toke up before going out on a route,” added Bloomberg.

“If one of my drivers crashes and kills someone and tests positive for marijuana, that’s my problem, not Amazon’s,” explained one delivery company owner, who requested anonymity because—would you look at that—Amazon discourages partners from speaking to the media.

In June, Amazon announced it would no longer screen applicants for the drug. It wasn’t long before the company began urging its delivery partners to do the same. And it looks like the company is not the only one coming up with creative ways to recruit more employees. Target announced this month that it would pay college tuition for its employees while Applebee’s offered free appetisers to applicants in its push to recruit 10,000 workers. Side note: cheers for the snacks Applebee’s but Target wins without a doubt.

Whether it truly means it or not, Amazon justified its pro-weed approach in a statement that said that marijuana testing has disproportionately affected communities of colour, stalling job growth. The company’s spokesperson also said that Amazon has zero tolerance for employees working while impaired. “If a delivery associate is impaired at work and tests positive post-accident or due to reasonable suspicion, that person would no longer be permitted to perform services for Amazon.”

According to Bloomberg, Amazon delivery contractors are often outbid by school bus companies, where drivers can make more than $20 an hour and are home for dinner. Amazon contract drivers typically earn $17 an hour and often work late into the night to keep up with demand. One solution against the delivery driver shortage would be to raise their wages. But it’s Amazon we’re talking about here.

Keep On Reading

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

Natalia Grace launches GoFundMe following explosive docuseries revealing her true age

By Abby Amoakuh

Mainstream media’s criticism of 9 to 5 girl is proof that boomers will always be out to get gen Z

By Alma Fabiani

Victoria’s Secret already ditches feminist makeover after sales drop

By Lightning-Bolt Baker

Gen Z are bringing dine-and-dashers to justice by publicly shaming them on social media

By Abby Amoakuh

Selena Gomez fans bash new boyfriend Benny Blanco and call him unworthy

By Abby Amoakuh

Videos circulate of CEO Sanjay Shah dying in freak accident in front of 700 people at company party

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

Two duvets, one love: How the Scandinavian sleep method transformed my nights

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

TikToker Victoria Paris slammed for comments about Paris bed bugs epidemic

By Charlie Sawyer

Why is #FreeLiamNissan trending on Twitter and what does Elon Musk have to do with Liam Neeson?

By Abby Amoakuh

Tory Crispin Blunt might be the latest MP accused of sexual misconduct, but he isn’t the first

By Charlie Sawyer

The Mean Girls musical reboot trailer just dropped and it’s giving gen Z tryhard energy

By Fatou Ferraro Mboup

To speak or not to speak: Celebrities are facing backlash over Israel-Palestine social media posts

By Bianca Borissova

How stan culture is turning manic pixie dream boy Timothée Chalamet’s fans into misogynistic haters

By Abby Amoakuh

21-year-old mistakes terminal cancer for normal back pain and dies within days

By Charlie Sawyer

Tucker Carlson and Darren Beattie allege US government planted pipe bombs night before Capitol riots

By Abby Amoakuh

New Alabama bill to add rape exception to abortion ban and punish rapists with castration

By Abby Amoakuh

Neuralink’s human implant success sparks fear for the future of society

By Fleurine Tideman

I’m still not over… 7 minutes in heaven

By Charlie Sawyer

Democrat fires white supremacist jab at Marjorie Taylor Greene, saying she’s late for Klan meeting

By Charlie Sawyer

How to invest in stocks, from one beginner to another