Plandemic theory: What conspiracy theorists and anti-vaxxers have to say about COVID-19

By Alma Fabiani

Updated May 19, 2020 at 01:47 PM

Reading time: 3 minutes

Conspiracy theories are one of the many downsides of the internet. From speculations about whether the US is hiding aliens in Area 51 and climate change deniers to anti-vaxxer and 5G conspiracy theorist Alex Jones, the internet has shown us that anything can be questioned, argued and doubted. Our imagination has no limits. That’s why, with the COVID-19 pandemic still in full force, we’ve also seen the rise of coronavirus conspiracy theorists. What do they have to say about COVID-19 and how are they spreading their message?

Anti-vaxxers

In 2019, the US saw measles make a comeback after it was declared to be eliminated in 2000. This was a result of anti-vaxxers, also known as people who are opposed to vaccinations, who lowered herd immunity and circulated false information on the side effects of vaccines. Back to 2020, just as we’re getting close to 300,000 deaths worldwide from coronavirus, COVID-19 conspiracy theories videos are thriving, especially on YouTube.

In the past few years, YouTube has introduced new rules in an attempt to regulate false information and stop health misinformation. The platform’s ever-changing list of policies about misinformation already highlighted the need for conspiracy theorists to be monitored. Now, YouTube’s rules state that videos containing “medical misinformation” about coronavirus are against advertiser guidelines and the platform’s community standards on which content is allowed on YouTube at all.

And yet, videos that question the transmission or even the existence of COVID-19, promote false cures or encourage viewers to ignore official guidance are flooding the platform. Although a simple search for ‘COVID-19 conspiracy theories’ will not show the many videos, the algorithm will still recommend some of these. YouTube, along with many social media platforms and messaging apps, is still struggling to limit the spread of misinformation and popular conspiracy theories.

And it seems that conspiracy theorists are not only accumulating a worrying number of views on YouTube—a recent theory received more than 1 million views in one week just before getting deleted—but they are also raking in huge profits. Although these videos are not technically supposed to receive any advertising, some still manage to cheat the algorithm. By combining paid advertising with the impressive number of views their videos receive, conspiracy theorists have found an easy way to profit from the coronavirus crisis.

Alex Jones

But this is not the only way conspiracy theorists are using YouTube as a means to reach a wider audience. The platform advises any user to seek out new audiences in order to expand their reach and get more views. This includes collaborating on videos with other YouTubers who have their own audience. For example, Alex Jones repeatedly (and unsuccessfully) tried to make a ‘collab video’ with PewDiePie, one of YouTube’s biggest YouTubers, in order to reach his 104 million subscribers.

This highlights the danger conspiracy theorists represent. Anti-vaxxers, and more recently, COVID-19 conspiracy theorists are well aware of the loopholes that social media and other platforms present and take advantage of them to promote their (false) message and spread misinformation. They’re everywhere, from YouTube and TikTok to Instagram and Twitter.

David Icke

While YouTube is trying to ban creators who break the rules, some conspiracy theorists have been using collabs and interviews as a way to work around those regulations by getting other YouTubers to host them on their channels. Patrick Bet-David, creator of the YouTube channel Valuetainment, told the MIT Technology Review in How covid-19 conspiracy theorists are exploiting YouTube culture that he had been approached by “fans asking him to interview David Icke, a conspiracy theorist whose own channel was recently removed from YouTube after he repeatedly violated the platform’s policies on COVID-19 misinformation.”

Bet-David decided to accept and interview Icke while challenging him on his views. The video received 800,000 views and resulted in Bet-David receiving more messages from YouTube users asking him to interview other conspiracy theorists, which he did. Although he told the MIT Technology Review that he is only responsible for what comes out of his mouth and would not take responsibility for helping spread false information through his videos, Bet-David is just another example of how conspiracy theorists can use the internet to expand their reach.

'Plandemic', Bill Gates and 5G

The latest COVID-19 conspiracy theory has taken off on social media, after a short documentary titled Plandemic appeared online. As expected, the video racked up millions of views before Facebook and YouTube took it down. The theory states that coronavirus was actually created in laboratories in order to eventually force everyone to get vaccinated. But anti-vaxxers are certain that the human immune system would be able to fight COVID-19 off if they avoid wearing face masks and hand-washing, which “activate” the virus and help to spread it. 

In this documentary, Bill Gates, who is also blamed by many 5G conspiracy theorists, is at the centre of the narrative. The Gates Foundation, and Gates himself, are both considered the “architects of the Plandemic”. Although the movement started in the US, it has now spread worldwide when a recent anti-lockdown protest in Melbourne, Australia, had the crowd chanting “arrest Bill Gates.”

This spread of misinformation can sometimes lead to harassment or violence and push people to ignore life-saving public health guidelines. Similarly to what happened with anti-vaxxers and measles last year, the theories trying to refute the severity or existence of COVID-19 are putting everyone in danger and need to be stopped.

But who exactly should be held accountable? Is this something that only YouTube can regulate? When lives are put at risk, it seems urgent for the government to take a closer look into things.

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