The internet is convinced that the Obama sisters are this decade’s Olsen twins and we’re here for it

By Jennifer Raymont

Updated May 25, 2023 at 11:21 AM

Reading time: 2 minutes

Sasha and Malia Obama are prime examples of nepotism done right. Their dad, Barack Obama, may have once been the most powerful man in the world, giving them access to any opportunity their heart desires but unlike, say, Brooklyn Beckham or Hailey Bieber, these two sisters opted for a more humble route to success.

The eldest of the two, Malia, followed in her father’s footsteps and headed to Harvard University. From there, she went on to intern at The Weinstein Company—this was all, of course, prior to the #MeToo movement. But what really sets her aside from other nepo babies is that she didn’t once shove the internship down our throats on socials.

Neither of the sisters has social media for that matter. Oh, and if you weren’t already at least mildly impressed, Malia was also a part of the executive team behind Amazon Prime’s Swarm.

Meanwhile, younger sister Sasha nabbed a summer job in a restaurant while studying at the University of Southern California. Aside from being an ex-President’s daughter and therefore realistically having a ton more cash in hand, she’s just like us!

Now, onto the fashion. In the early days of their time at the White House, the pair wore matching dresses and ballet pumps—it was all very prim and proper. Fast forward to the present, and their style, like their careers, has become much more laid back. If there was one way to describe it, it’s giving a gen Z take on Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen‘s street style.

Whether you knew the Olsen twins as toddlers in Full House or as teenage sweethearts in Holiday in the Sun, it’s safe to say that the identical duo have always known how to dress—often papped in oversized wool coats, a battered Birkin and cigarette in hand. We’re not saying the twins are an ad for smoking but we may use one as a prop if it makes us look that cool.

 

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A post shared by Mary-Kate & Ashley Olsen (@marykateandashleyo)

Malia seems to be the sister that’s taken up the bad habit, having been papped smoking in 2017. Her outfits appear as if they were quickly thrown on in a last-minute rush for work, she is a busy corporate girlie after all.

 

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Sasha, arguably the more experimental of the two, layers clashing prints and always falls back on a trusty pair of dungarees. Her acrylic nails are also a head-turner, it’s a wonder she can get anything done they’re that long. We’d give anything to scroll through her saves on Pinterest.

 

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Now, it would be rude to compliment the style of these political royals, without giving credit to their mother, Michelle Obama. Like her daughters, Michelle’s style transformed as soon as she stepped out of the White House.

As First Lady, her wardrobe was definitely limited, from the colour palette she had to choose from to the shoes she was permitted to wear. That’s all over now, the former Mrs President is free to test boundaries with her style. She jumped on the double denim revival, arguably before anyone else did, sporting an iconic Ganni suit. Michelle has even played with patterns more than her younger daughter.

 

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Michelle also kept her hair straight during her husband’s presidency, most likely to avoid racist comments. When asked about the decision to keep her hair straight and flat, she famously said: “It would have been, ‘Remember when she wore braids? Those are terrorist braids. Those are revolutionary braids.’ So let me keep my hair straight, let’s get health care passed.”

The Obamas are one famous family. And for years now they’ve been making statements in politics, history, and culture—it seems only right that fashion is next. The Olsens made it to the Met Gala so let’s give Malia and Sasha the invite already, am I right?

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