The Flash director and producer speak out on Ezra Miller controversy following drop of new trailer

By Charlie Sawyer

Published Apr 26, 2023 at 12:47 PM

Reading time: 2 minutes

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After months of speculation and anticipation, DC finally released a full-scaled trailer for its upcoming blockbuster The Flash. And, while most fans watched with bated breath, hoping to spot their favourite superhero or villain, anguishing over the cinematic effects and celebrating when OG Batman Michael Keaton appeared on screen, others felt a twinge of internal friction and discord. Because how can we be so excited about a film which, at its very core, is platforming and promoting the very controversial and highly problematic Ezra Miller?

Now, before we dive into the most recent updates surrounding the celebrity, it’s important to briefly recap some of the most significant aspects of Miller’s dicey history. The actor has been arrested on numerous occasions and for countless different reasons, spanning from burglary and public nuisance charges to serious assault allegations—including an incident in 2020 where Miller allegedly choked a woman after an altercation at a bar.

Following this, the The Perks of Being a Wallflower actor also faced accusations of grooming and mistreating a young environmentalist named Tokata Iron Eyes. The young activist was only 12 years old when they first met Miller (who was 23 at the time) and the two struck up a friendship. Over the past few years, rumours have surfaced that Miller repeatedly gave Iron Eyes alcohol, drugs, and also kept the activist isolated from friends and family.

While people might assume that the combination of all of these behaviours would have resulted in Miller facing a swift exile from the film industry, they’d be wrong. Having first secured the role of Barry Allen / The Flash in 2014, and having featured in DC film Justice League, it was officially confirmed that the actor would indeed reprise their role in the 2023 eponymous film The Flash.

Fans have had very mixed opinions on Miller’s continuing involvement in the DC Universe. Some are far too enamoured with their portrayal of The Flash to be majorly concerned, while others have stated that they’ll be boycotting the film in protest.

The top dogs behind the upcoming movie have also now made a public statement regarding Miller. According to Entertainment Weekly, director Andy Muschietti and producer Barbara Muschietti spoke to press on the Warner Bros. lot in Los Angeles on Monday 24 April to screen the current cut of the film in its entirety and participate in a Q&A.

When asked about Miller’s current state of mind, the two responded: “We’re all hoping that they get better… They’re taking the steps to recovery. They’re dealing with mental health issues, but they’re well. We talked to them not too long ago, and they’re very committed to getting better.”

The producer concluded: “And, I have to say, during our shoot, during principal photography, their commitment to the role was something we’ve never seen. And the discipline to the work, the willingness—physical, mental, and just wanting to go beyond the pale—is just amazing.”

Some netizens have been comparing the treatment of Miller with that of Marvel actor Jonathan Majors, who, after being charged with assault on 25 March 2023 and being faced with a myriad of abuse allegations, was dropped by his management. It’s still unknown as to whether or not Majors will be allowed to keep his current spot as villain Kang in future Marvel films, but it’s highly probable that the actor will also be dropped from those projects.

The overall consensus is that Majors has been rightfully ousted, however, some individuals are definitely keen to address the hypocrisy of Miller seemingly still welcomed and protected within DC’s arms.

The Flash is set to hit our screens on 16 June, and whichever side you sit on within this debate, it’s sure to be an interesting opening weekend.

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